Posted in Life, Love and Laughter, Outdoors

Wild Haggis and Dangerous Perygls 

Today I read a Tweet from QI Quite Interesting @qikipedia, that told a fascinating fact about the humble Haggis.

Apparently, in a 2003 poll 1/3 of American visitors to Scotland thought the Haggis ran wild around the Scottish moors. When I looked through the comments thread below the original tweet, it became quite clear that this is obviously complete nonsense.

  1. Many found it hard to believe that only 1/3 of Americans believed this fact.
  2. The Haggis’s (or Hagi) roamed the Highlands, not the moors.
  3. Haggis no longer roam freely at all and are now only found on private farms and bred exclusively in captivity.

Fascinating fact number 2 about the Haggis – as it lives on the sides of mountains the legs perygl--danger--welsh-english-sign-on one side of its body are shorter than on the other, so they don’t fall down the hillside. Then they will forever travel around the mountains either clockwise or counter-clockwise, depending on their legs. To mate, there needs to be a breeding pair with opposite short legs so they don’t fall over, and in order to catch a Haggis you need to get them to change direction so they fall and roll down the hill, where the hunter can then easily scoop them up.

Several years ago, a friend of mine took a French colleague to Scotland on a research trip. He had never been before so, my friend packed a picnic, they went for a boat ride and he told his colleague all about the Haggis.

Whilst they ate their picnic, he handed across a scotch egg. The French visitor had never seen one before and asked what they were. He was told that they were in fact, Haggis testicles. The skipper confirmed this fact. Our French visitor who is used to eating such delicacies as frog’s legs and foie gras, (no stereo-typing here at all) declared “That is disgusting!” and refused to touch it. Weeks later when they were re-telling the story to everyone at work, he was adamant, he would never, EVER touch a scotch egg in his life. He’d be no good in a Bush Tucker Trial, that’s for sure.

The story of the Haggis reminds me of a similar tale from a Celtic nation not too far from downloadScotland. In Wales there lurks the dreaded Perygl. On cliff edges, mountains and at the edges of bodies of water, you often find signs warning of the dangers of the Perygl. Schoolchildren and city slicker’s on adventurous holidays are shown these signs and told to keep a look out for the Perygl, particularly at night if sleeping in a tent, whilst also staying away from cliff edges, looking out for trip hazards and other dangers, of course. No one really knows what they look like, but they are rumoured to be small and ferocious creatures, and they populate the whole of the Welsh nation. None have ever been seen in neighbouring England, though warning signs can be found on the border.

Original tweet https://twitter.com/qikipedia/status/1087016907759185920

Author:

1 husband, 3 kids, 2 step-kids, 2 dogs, 1 cat, one business, 1 milion things going through my head at any one time and one dream - to write. Love - the writings of Patrick Rothfuss and Jane Austen, the poetry of Keats and Wilfred Owen, the art of Jack Vettriano and Zdzislaw Beksinski, sunflowers and sunsets, Eeyore and Channing Tatum, the sea, Pembrokeshire and contradictions. Hate - confrontation, waste, procrastination (despite being champion at it), horror movies and loneliness.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.